Telling our story

team

How, when, where, why and by whom is our story being told?

We need to tell our story better. As a company we have taken the first steps and chosen our channels for communication. Now, we are faced with a new challenge – we need more voices to share our story, we need to communicate better internally, and we need to value the strength found in our numbers.

For a story to become alive it has to be told.

Starting from Zero

When we began sharing our story we needed to ensure we were all in the same boat, fighting the bigger competitors and markets together. Once our solidarity was in check, our next move was to select tools to make the boat go faster, build it bigger, and make it stronger. We set up company profiles with different social media channels, a task made easier because we already had our own personal profiles.

Setting up company profiles meant that we had to start with 0 followers on Twitter, 0 fans on Facebook, and 0 pictures on Instagram – can you even remember the day you had 0 friends or fans on Facebook?

Sharing your story is easier if you begin in familiar territory.

Hoisting the sails

After setting up our profiles for different social media channels, we felt happy. Now, we had a presence! After the initial pats on the back, we soon realised that it is not enough to simply create profiles. The real work comes from maintaining them well.

For some time, our marketing and sales manager has been voicing our story. Pictures appeared on our Instagram, tweets were sent out daily, and Facebook stayed up-to-date. LinkedIn and Sortfolio were brought to life with new content. We even started this blog, spreading our story every two weeks. Again, we were happy, and sailing smoothly forward.

Don’t just be, but be active.

Change in the winds

We find ourselves out in the open sea, and we need more hands on deck. We need more members of our team to actively tell booncon’s story, share our ideas and tell why we are here.

In business terms this means being more engaged and committed. We feel improving our internal communication is our best bet for achieving this goal. Recent research in the field encourages this too. Internal communication has been defined to

“promote commitment and a sense of belonging to the organisation, to develop awareness of its changing environment, and understanding of its evolving aims.”(1)

For our team this translates into exchanging more information amongst each other about how our story is being shared and how all of us can be better contributors.

Other research suggests that there is a strong link between excelling in internal communication and higher market premiums, higher shareholder returns over five years, higher levels of employee engagement, and lower employee turnover (2). We are discovering that internal communication is obviously something to be taken seriously.

Without internal communication you can’t be consistent externally.

The more the merrier!

Looking at our social media status today we are no longer at 0. Altogether in our different channels we are up to 262 fans and followers. However, we could do much better. Add up all of our personal connections, fans and followers and you get the number 4 708.

Our challenge for the rest of 2013 is doing more together, combining the forces of our 8 team members. Having more than ten fingers typing, liking, sharing, and commenting in different channels, and having all of our mouths telling our story – who we are, what do we do, why do we do it, and why you should be a part of it too 😉

“You can never have enough reputation” – Warren Buffet

How did you start sharing your story? Similar experiences?

Happy storytelling, tschüß!

Sources:

  1. Welch, M. & Jackson, P. R. (2007). Rethinking Internal Communication: a Stakeholder Approach. Corporate Communications: An International Journal, 12(2), pp. 177-198.

  2. Chong, M. (2007). The Role of Internal Communication and Training in Infusing Corporate Values and Delivering Brand Promises: Singapore Airlines’ Experience. Corporate Reputation Review, 10(3), pp. 201–212.